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To: <mwforum@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Subject: Re: Maze and keys
From: "Mike Sandy" <mjsandy@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Date: Thu, 13 Oct 2005 15:20:31 +0100

Attached is a "simple" example of the use of parallel
(independent) processes.
START initially has LAUNCH commented out.
EVERYONE makes each turtle in turn run the proc. ACTION
If you remove the comment marks, each turtle's action is LAUNCHED
i.e. converted into and independent process. EVERYONE then doesn't wait
until t1's process stops before launching the next.
I've made ACTION a recursive procedure since it is an easy way to stop
an individual turtle without affecting the rest.
The START button remains down while the program is running so you can stop the program by clicking START.
If you use FOREVER as a public procedure then STOPALL or CANCEL are
required.


The alternative method is to use the BACKPACK.
I've programmed ONCLICK but you need to alter ONCOLOR.
Perhaps those who are actually teaching beginners can add something
more enlightening.
Mike

----- Original Message ----- From: "Burke, Bridget -CKJH" <BRIDGETBU@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
To: <mwforum@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Tuesday, October 11, 2005 7:32 PM
Subject: RE: Maze and keys



Thanks, Mikes for the insight on running parallel processes. Now, how do
I teach this concept? Does anyone have a simpler example for show
students? Do programmers use Main and Start as standards in writing
complex programs?

Attachment: race1.mwx
Description: Binary data


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